Student research links

http://www.anyquestions.co.nz/ 

This is a free online homework help for New Zealand school students. Students can log on Monday to Friday 1-6 pm to ‘talk’ to a real person about homework. It is staffed by friendly and skilled librarians from around NZ who will help students with how to find the answers they need. It is intended as a guide on the side at the point of time of need.   

http://www.manyanswers.co.nz/

For those times when the Librarians are not online at AnyQuestions. ManyAnswers has answers to the most commonly asked questions on AnyQuestions. It is free and easy to use, 24 hours a day and if you can’t find the answer you are looking for you can submit a question.

http://www.digitalnz.org/

Well known for its search service,helping people use digital material from libraries, museums, government departments, publicly funded organisations, the private sector, and community groups.  You can search across more than 20 million digital items to discover New Zealand treasures such as amazing aerial photos, old posters and memorabilia, newspaper clippings, artworks, and publications.

http://www.matapihi.org.nz/

Another site to search the places, events & people of Aotearoa New Zealand. You can experience a selection of pictures, sounds and objects from New Zealand’s archives, galleries, libraries and museums.

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/

Contains more than two million pages of digitised New Zealand newspapers and periodicals. The collection covers the years 1839 to 1945 and includes 70 publications from all regions of New Zealand.  You can search and browse newspapers by date, region or title.

http://schools.natlib.govt.nz/culture-identity-heritage/primary-sources/gallery

Access previously un-available primary sources and discover what happened in NZ’s past.

Primary sources are the raw material of history. They are original, first hand and often unedited.  They include letters, photos, even emails. They are created as people experience events, and record what they saw, heard and felt. Students get a strong sense of the context of historical events from the perspective of the person who documented the event